Movie Ratings That Actually Work    Become a Member

"One of the 50 Coolest Websites...they simply tell it like it is" - TIME

C’mon C’mon | 2021 | R | – 2.3.7

content-ratingsWhy is “C’mon C’mon” rated R? The MPAA rating has been assigned for “language.” The Kids-In-Mind.com evaluation includes discussions of relationships, a reference to a woman having an abortion, a boy running off and hiding a couple of times, references to mental illness, a man collapsing but recovering, several arguments and about 25 F-words and other strong language. Read our parents’ guide below for details on sexual content, violence & strong language.


A man (Joaquin Phoenix) is tasked with caring for his young nephew (Woody Norman) when his sister (Gaby Hoffmann) must care for her mentally ill husband (Scoot McNairy). The two endeavor to get to know each other while traveling together and recording interviews with young people about their hopes and fears. Also with Molly Webster, Jaboukie Young-White and Deborah Strang. Directed by Mike Mills. [Running Time: 1:48]

C’mon C’mon SEX/NUDITY 2

 – A boy says that his mother told him that she ran away from home when she was a teenager and that she got in trouble and had an abortion. A young boy asks a man, “Why aren’t you married,” and when the man tells him that he was with a woman for a long time, the boy asks, “Did you love her?” and “Why did you break up?”
 A woman wears low-cut tops that reveal cleavage in several scenes and we see cleavage and her bra when she leans over in a couple of scenes. Surfers are seen in the distance on boards and wearing swimsuits that reveal bare chests and abdomens. Men and women are shown wearing swimsuits on a beach in a couple of scenes (cleavage, bare abdomens, backs, legs and chests are shown). Participants in a parade are shown wearing low-cut outfits that reveal cleavage.

C’mon C’mon VIOLENCE/GORE 3

 – A boy wanders away from a man in a crowded city street and the man panics and runs back and forth when he can’t find him; when he does find him the boy is upset, says, “You lost me,” and gets on a bus. A boy hides in a store and a man that’s with him panics when he can’t find him; they yell at each other and the boy storms out of the store. A man carries a boy on his back in a parade and he stumbles to the sidewalk and collapses; the boy is worried and others help the man back up (he seems fine later).
 A man and a woman argue in a few scenes and one scene without sound shows them arguing bitterly. A husband and his wife argue with angry gestures, without sound. A woman comes home to find that her husband has left and she searches for him. A boy and a man argue and the boy cries and storms into a bathroom slamming the door behind him. A man yells outside a bathroom door when a boy locks himself inside and won’t come out. A boy runs into woods when the boy’s mother tells him over the phone that she is coming to take him home; the boy is frustrated and he and the man yell and curse several times, they stomp on the ground and kick the dirt.
 Many interviews are conducted with young people in Detroit, New York City and New Orleans and they are asked about their hopes and fears and what they imagine the future will be like. An elderly woman in a bed asks her adult son to help her get dressed because her father is coming to take her to the BMV to get her license. A woman talks about needing to convince a man to go to a mental health clinic for help. Children talk about fearing loneliness. A boy talks about his mother telling him that he should not cry. Children talk about worrying about whether the bad things that are happening in the world will get worse. A boy says that his father is in jail and that the boy feels responsible for protecting his younger sister from the ugliness in the world. Children talk about a genetic component to violent behavior and that they have the power to overcome it. A boy says that moms understand what kids are going through. A man asks children, “What do you think happens after you die.”
 A man and a woman talk about mourning their mother’s death. A woman is frustrated by the fact that her husband relocated for a job and he got a dog; it is implied that the man is mentally ill and needs medical intervention. A young boy plays a game with his mother and his uncle in a few scenes pretending to be an orphan visiting them just for the night; he talks about the conditions of the orphanage and makes up a story that the adults’ children had died and the mother plays along but the uncle is uncomfortable with the idea. A boy asks a man why the boy’s mother stopped talking to the man. A boy says that his mother told him that she ran away from home when she was a teenager and that she got in trouble and had an abortion. A man reads a story titled, “Bipolar Bear.” A boy talks to adults about how to control their feelings. A boy instructs a man on how to stay calm and practice mindfulness. A boy says that he has no friends. A man is checked into a mental health clinic and is told that he must remove his shoelaces. A woman tells a man, “Nobody knows what they are doing with these kids,” when he feels unable to properly care for a boy. A boy says that he is embarrassed because he cried when he got frustrated. A man talks about getting in the middle of his sister’s relationship with her husband that led to their estrangement. A man talks about a woman leaving him and that everything just exploded.
 A boy becomes hyperactive and talks nonstop after eating sugar. A boy talks about fungus tubes that connect trees underground. A boy talks about not being able to sleep in an orphanage because all the kids snore. A boy tells a man that he needs to go to the bathroom when they are on the way to the airport and they pull over for him to go into a diner and use the bathroom (he does not need to go).

C’mon C’mon LANGUAGE 7

 – About 25 F-words, 10 scatological terms, 2 anatomical terms, 1 mild obscenity, name-calling (weird, awkward, stupid, ridiculous, out of touch, terrible, selfish, crazy, strange, eccentric, paranoid, boring, frustrated, nightmare, old man, harsh, dumb kids, awful, humiliating), exclamations (oh man, freaking out, don’t worry, hey man, get off me, who cares, blah blah blah, oh no), 1 religious profanity (GD), 5 religious exclamations (e.g. oh God, oh my God, oh God no, Jesus Christ). | profanity glossary |

C’mon C’mon SUBSTANCE USE

 – None.

C’mon C’mon DISCUSSION TOPICS

 – Estranged families, death of a parent, mental illness, sibling relationships, hate, image of self, responsibility, motherhood, working mothers, honesty, conspiracy theories, the future, secrets, respect, ghosts, reincarnation, fears, hope, immigration, racial injustice, loneliness, destruction of the Earth, fairness, America, abortion, delusions.

C’mon C’mon MESSAGE

 – Take your time to find out who you are.

CAVEATS

Be aware that while we do our best to avoid spoilers it is impossible to disguise all details and some may reveal crucial plot elements.

We've gone through several editorial changes since we started covering films in 1992 and older reviews are not as complete & accurate as recent ones; we plan to revisit and correct older reviews as resources and time permits.

Our ratings and reviews are based on the theatrically-released versions of films; on video there are often Unrated, Special, Director's Cut or Extended versions, (usually accurately labelled but sometimes mislabeled) released that contain additional content, which we did not review.


how to
support us

PLEASE DONATE

We are a totally independent website with no connections to political, religious or other groups & we neither solicit nor choose advertisers. You can help us keep our independence with a donation.

NO MORE ADS!

Become a member of our premium site for just $2/month & access advance reviews, without any ads, not a single one, ever. And you will be helping support our website & our efforts.

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

We welcome suggestions & criticisms -- and we accept compliments too. While we read all emails & try to reply we don't always manage to do so; be assured that we will not share your e-mail address.

how to
support us

PLEASE DONATE

We are a totally independent website with no connections to political, religious or other groups & we neither solicit nor choose advertisers. You can help us keep our independence with a donation.

NO MORE ADS!

Become a member of our premium site for just $2/month & access advance reviews, without any ads, not a single one, ever. And you will be helping support our website & our efforts.

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

We welcome suggestions & criticisms -- and we will accept compliments too. While we read all emails & try to reply we do not always manage to do so; be assured that we will not share your e-mail address.

Subscribe to our newsletter

Subscribe to our newsletter

Know when new reviews are published
We will never sell or share your email address with anybody and you can unsubscribe at any time

You're all set! Please check your email for confirmation.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This