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A Beautiful Day In The Neighborhood | 2019 | PG | – 1.4.2

content-ratingsWhy is “A Beautiful Day In The Neighborhood” rated PG? The MPAA rating has been assigned for “some strong thematic material, a brief fight, and some mild language.” The Kids-In-Mind.com evaluation includes a few kisses and some cleavage revealing outfits; a fight with punches and shoving resulting in a bloody wound, several arguments, and discussions of dealing with emotions in an appropriate way; and some mild language. Read our parents’ guide below for details on sexual content, violence & strong language.”


Based on the true story of a friendship that developed between the beloved children’s TV programmer, Fred Rogers (Tom Hanks) and a magazine writer (Matthew Rhys) tasked with writing a story about heroes. Also with Chris Cooper, Susan Kelechi Watson, Maryann Plunkett, Enrico Colantoni, Wendy Makkena, Tammy Blanchard, Noah Harpster, Carmen Cusack and Christine Lahti. Directed by Marielle Heller. [Running Time: 1:48]

A Beautiful Day In The Neighborhood SEX/NUDITY 1

 – A husband and his wife kiss in a few scenes. A husband and his wife hug tenderly.
 A woman nurses her infant child in a couple of scenes (no flesh is shown).
 A woman wears a low-cut dress that reveals cleavage and part of her bra when she leans over a table. A woman wears a low-cut top that reveals cleavage in a few scenes. Women wear low-cut evening gowns that reveal cleavage, bare shoulders and backs. A man sleeps shirtless and we see his bare chest and shoulders.


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A Beautiful Day In The Neighborhood VIOLENCE/GORE 4

 – Two men argue and one man punches the other in the face, he falls back and the first man shoves another man who slams into a woman spilling wine on her dress and another man punches the first man in the nose (we see his bloody face).
 A man yells at his estranged father and tells him to leave his apartment; he talks about his father having “slept around” while his mother was dying when he was a young boy and the father holds his head and collapses on the floor (we see him in the hospital later and understand that he is dying).
 A man becomes angry and storms out of another man’s apartment. A man yells at another man. A husband yells at his wife and they argue briefly. A wife pleads with her husband not to “Ruin my childhood” when writing a magazine article about Fred Rogers. A man talks about his mother having died when he was young and that she screamed in pain when she was dying. A man says that he stopped making his TV show during a point when he and his family were struggling. A man says that as a teenager his son tested him. A man asks another man if he isn’t “too old to have a baby.” A man talks about having been bullied when he was young and how he dealt with feeling sad and angry. A man tells another man, “You don’t care much for humanity.” A man says, “I hate hospitals.” A puppet character talks about something that happened that made him so angry and that the friend that hurt him did not apologize. A man enters his apartment where many women with infants are gathered and he says, “It smells in here,” to which his wife makes a remark about all the diapers.
 A man has a flashback to his mother lying in a hospital bed. People gather and mourn at a funeral. A man pounds heavily on piano keys a few times. A man tries to talk to another man in several scenes but he won’t engage and we see him parked outside the man’s apartment later for an extended period of time hoping to speak to him.
 A man imagines being on the set of a TV show and actually participating in the show and we see him lying unconscious on the floor after he collapses (he’s fine later). A man angrily slams a child restraint seat around in the back of a taxi when it will not get secured. We see a photograph of a man with a cut and blood on his nose. We see the World Trade Center towers in a model city.
 A young boy with an oxygen tube at his nose and a tank behind him on a TV set swings a plastic sword while a man talks to him and he hits his father standing next to him; the boy’s parents try to correct the boy as the other man talks to him calmly. A man struggles to set up a tent on a TV set and is unable to do so.


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A Beautiful Day In The Neighborhood LANGUAGE 2

 – 1 scatological term, 4 mild obscenities, name-calling (misfits, doll, fat Freddy, chubby, puff pieces, hokey kids’ show guy, peanut, out of control, messed up, mom thing, selfish, cruel, rich jerks, stubborn goat, Mr. freaking Rogers, bum, insane, living saint, people like you, ridiculous, broken people), exclamations (yikes, oh, oh my, mercy, oh mercy), 4 religious exclamations (e.g. Oh My God, Oh God, My God, Holy [scatological term deleted]). | profanity glossary |


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A Beautiful Day In The Neighborhood SUBSTANCE USE

 – People drink alcohol and wine at a wedding reception, two men drink glasses of bourbon, people hold glasses of wine at a gathering in a home, and a man says that another man is “drunk.”


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A Beautiful Day In The Neighborhood DISCUSSION TOPICS

 – Forgiveness, childhood trauma, estranged fathers, death of a parent, family, guilt, vegetarianism, perspective, death, divorce, war, hopelessness, celebrity, fame, bullying, investigative reporting, heroes, anger, feelings, changing a broken world with words, knowing right and wrong, helping children deal with their emotions positively.

A Beautiful Day In The Neighborhood MESSAGE

 – Remember your own childhood. There is no life free from pain.

CAVEATS

Be aware that while we do our best to avoid spoilers it is impossible to disguise all details and some may reveal crucial plot elements.

We've gone through several editorial changes since we started covering films in 1992 and older reviews are not as complete & accurate as recent ones; we plan to revisit and correct older reviews as resources and time permits.

Our ratings and reviews are based on the theatrically-released versions of films; on video there are often Unrated, Special, Director's Cut or Extended versions, (usually accurately labelled but sometimes mislabeled) released that contain additional content, which we did not review.



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