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Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris | 2022 | PG | – 3.2.2

content-ratingsWhy is “Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris” rated PG? The MPAA rating has been assigned for “suggestive material, language and smoking.” The Kids-In-Mind.com evaluation includes a few kisses between a man and a woman, an implication of infidelity, reports of the death of a man in war and a woman, a woman’s dress catching fire with no injuries, several arguments, and some name-calling. Read our parents’ guide below for details on sexual content, violence & strong language.


Set in London in the late 1950s, a widow (Lesley Manville) and cleaning woman for the wealthy dreams of going to Paris and buying a Chistian Dior gown. Once she arrives in Paris, she learns that being welcomed to the prestigious haute couture requires more than money. Also with Jason Isaacs, Rose Williams, Anna Chancellor, Ellen Thomas, Lambert Wilson, Alba Baptista, Roxane Duran, Christian McKay and Giles Newcombe. Directed by Anthony Fabian. A few lines of dialogue are spoken in French with English subtitles. [Running Time: 1:55]

Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris SEX/NUDITY 3

 – Women on a stage dance and kick their legs up during a show; they remove their outer clothing to reveal bra tops with tassels (cleavage, abdomens and bare shoulders are seen) and fishnet stocking covered legs and men in the show are seen shirtless (bare chests, abdomens and backs are seen). Women are shown in a dressing room in a few scenes and we see them wearing undergarments that reveal cleavage and bare shoulders. Women wear low-cut gowns that reveal cleavage and bare shoulders in a fashion show. A woman wears a low-cut top that reveals cleavage.
 A man kisses a young woman in front of people gathered at a movie premier and men kiss women’s hands in a couple of scenes.
 Men and women dance in a pub and in a cabaret. A man takes a woman’s measurements for a gown. A young woman rides on the back of a motorbike holding the driver around the waist and a woman rides on the back of a motorbike holding the driver around the waist.
 A young woman tells a woman, “You’ve made a conquest,” when she sees her in a club with a man. A woman is disappointed when she realizes that a man is not interested in her romantically. A young man is frustrated when he is in love with a young woman but doesn’t feel like he can tell her. A woman greets a man as they pass on a staircase several times and he is accompanied by a different younger woman each time, whom he introduces as his “niece” (extramarital affairs are implied).

Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris VIOLENCE/GORE 2

 – A woman leans over a heater to look in a mirror and her dress catches fire; a man seated nearby throws a bucket of ice on her to douse the flames (she is not injured but the dress is ruined). A woman swats another woman in the face with her fur stole.
 A young man and a young woman bump their heads together when they bend over to pick up a spilled bag of groceries. A young woman bumps into another woman and the young woman falls on the ground; another woman helps her up and chases after her to return the purse that she dropped. A woman is nearly knocked down by a man riding a bicycle on a sidewalk on a foggy night.
 A woman becomes angry when a military representative tells her that she owes back pay for her husband and that he continued to be paid wages even after he died in action (his body had not been found until later); she tells him, “I’ll tell you where you can put that stick.” A woman gives her notice to an employer and tells her that she should not treat people the way that she does. A woman enters a fashion house and a woman inside calls for someone to remove her.
 A woman grabs a man’s arm when an airplane taxis on the runway (they do not take off because of engine trouble). A taxi speeds through streets and the passenger becomes nervous; the car screeches to a stop when the road is blocked by protestors. A woman pushes through people working in a fashion house and tells them that they should go on strike. A young woman cries when she has damaged a dress that she needs to wear for an event (we see a large stain on the front of the dress).
 A woman tells a young man that she is going to hit him if he doesn’t do something. A man says that he is a communist. A woman tells another woman that her husband is never coming home. A woman opens a box that contains her husband’s wedding ring and a letter telling her that her husband died in a plane crash in war. A man tells a woman that his wife is dead. A woman says that her husband was “damaged in the war” and that she takes care of him. A woman is outraged when she realizes that she will have to sit next to a “common” person at a fashion house showing. A woman is disappointed when she realizes that a man is not interested in her romantically. A woman wakes up late with a hangover and panics to get to a fitting; she is turned away and pleads for them to reconsider. A man tells a woman that he was weak as a child and that he was perpetually bullied. A woman tells another woman that her husband must not know about a very expensive gown she purchased. A man remarks about not knowing that a woman (a cleaning person) was there if it weren’t for the “polish on his knobs.” A woman asks for her back pay and her employer tells her that she will need to cut back her hours.
 A woman is devastated when a dog she bet a lot of money on doesn’t finish a race. People bet on greyhound racing; one race begins and a dog in the lead stops before the finish line and limps a bit as the rest of the dogs speed past him. Garbage piles up on streets and sidewalks throughout the movie and we understand that the sanitation workers are on strike.

Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris LANGUAGE 2

 – 2 anatomical terms, name-calling (simple, fat, deranged, balmy, idiot, stupid, cretin, ugly, old, nobody, invisible, bossy, poor mite, weak, ghastly publicity stunt, scum, runt, dirty boss), exclamations (bloody, oh for goodness sake, go on, give over, for the love of…, whoo-ha, oh dear, fine and dandy, for the love of Mike, blimey), 8 religious exclamations (e.g. Christ, oh my God, oh thank God, oh for God’s sake, Lord knows, oh God). | profanity glossary |

Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris SUBSTANCE USE

 – Men and women drink brandy as well as ale and other cocktails in a few pub scenes, a man drinks from a bottle of liquor or wine and burps and a woman drinks from the same bottle, people in a cabaret club drink champagne, two women drink wine, and people drink wine with a meal. A man smokes cigarettes on a plane, and a man smokes in his home.

Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris DISCUSSION TOPICS

 – Truth, classism, being a snob, class system, death of loved ones, war, haute couture, ultimate sacrifice, infidelity, loyalty, taking advantage of kindness, betrayal, humiliation, defining your existence, existentialism, dreams, being invisible.

Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris MESSAGE

 – Follow your dreams.

CAVEATS

Be aware that while we do our best to avoid spoilers it is impossible to disguise all details and some may reveal crucial plot elements.

We've gone through several editorial changes since we started covering films in 1992 and older reviews are not as complete & accurate as recent ones; we plan to revisit and correct older reviews as resources and time permits.

Our ratings and reviews are based on the theatrically-released versions of films; on video there are often Unrated, Special, Director's Cut or Extended versions, (usually accurately labelled but sometimes mislabeled) released that contain additional content, which we did not review.


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