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Come Away | 2020 | PG | – 1.4.1

content-ratingsWhy is “Come Away” rated PG? The MPAA rating has been assigned for “strong thematic content, some violence, fantasy action, and unsettling images.” The Kids-In-Mind.com evaluation includes a kissing scene, the death of a boy by drowning, a man’s hand is crushed and then surgically removed, a man’s hand is cut off during a swordfight, threats of violence, discussions of debt and social class, several play fight scenes with imagined swords and spears, and some name-calling. Read our parents’ guide below for details on sexual content, violence & strong language.


With the help of their imaginations, two young children move on after a tragic accident kills their brother, but watch their mother and father grow apart in their grief, and they try to find a way to bring them back together. Also with Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Carter Thomas, Ava Fillery, Jonathan Garcia, Keira Chansa, Jordan A. Nash, Reece Yates, Jenny Galloway, Anna Chancellor and Michael Caine. Directed by Brenda Chapman. [Running Time: 1:34]

Come Away SEX/NUDITY 1

 – A husband and his wife complement each other, they dance, they kiss and he kisses her neck and chest.
 Women wear dresses that reveal cleavage in several scenes. A mermaid figurehead on the front of a ship is shown topless with bare breasts and abdomen shown from the side.


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Come Away VIOLENCE/GORE 4

 – A teen boy walks out onto a broken tree limb and when it breaks he falls into a river and drowns (we see him sinking under the water’s surface); we see people gathered for a funeral and a boy stands over a closed casket. A man groans and holds his hand wrapped with a bloody cloth as he says, “They crushed my hand”; we later hear that the doctors “Took his hand” and we see a stump at the wrist, with initials branded on it.
 A brick is thrown through the window of a house where children are sitting at a table and it shatters the glass. A man goes to a gambling establishment and he is confronted by another man about his outstanding debt. A young boy and a young girl sneak out of their house and to town where they walk through dark alleys and are chased by a man with a knife; the girl throws a basket in front of the man causing him to trip but he grabs her foot, until the boy steps on the man’s hand and he lets go shouting, “I’ll kill you”; the children hide as the man passes by. A man holds a glowing hot branding iron toward two children as they try to sell him a pocket watch. A woman slaps her young daughter in the face when she makes a demeaning remark about her father being from a lower class and the child runs to her room crying. A boy imagines fighting several men with swords, he cuts off the hand of one man, and the severed hand falls into the open mouth of a crocodile (we see a hook grow in its place).
 Two children go to a pawnshop where they see creepy things on display (skeletons of animals and a large stuffed crocodile hanging on the wall); a man leads them to a door where a spyglass pokes out toward them and the door seems to open by itself. A man slams a wooden replica of a ship against a table, splintering it, and throws other objects around a room breaking glass and other items. A woman reads a story about children in an orphanage and we see a man slap a young girl’s hand with a ruler and squishing a ladybug on her hand (we see a spot of blood) while children are shown being forced to work. A boy runs through woods chasing children that he imagines are playing there and he trips and falls (there are no injuries). A young girl finds a picture of her dead brother lying in a coffin in a locked box in her mother’s room. A man stumbles and knocks something off a table breaking it.
 A woman reprimands a young girl and tells her, “Speak when you are spoken to,” and she goes on to say that is no way for a young lady to act and also reprimands the girl’s mother for not teaching her the proper way to behave. A woman reprimands a young girl for biting her nails and says, “It’s a disgusting habit of the lower class.” A woman tells a teenage boy that he will be going away to boarding school and his family is shocked and surprised. A boy speaks to his father in his workshop and he startles and says, “You gave me a fright.” A boy shows his father a letter from his school saying that he is failing all of his subjects. A young girl asks her mother to “check for monsters” before bedtime and the woman looks under her bed and behind curtains. A young girl asks if people forget how to dream when they grow up. Two boys argue when one tries to help the other with homework. A boy says, “No one will catch me and make me a man.” Children talk about only children having “dream dust” when they sleep and we see streams of glowing glitter floating through the air. A voiceover says, “My mother seemed to be lost,” after the death of her son. A remark is made about fathers “dividing their sons.” A woman tells another woman, “Leave my house” when the woman says that she wants to take the other woman’s daughter with her.
 Two boys imagine that they are fighting with pirates and they slash swords (we hear the clanking and slashing of metal) and one boy slashes a few pirates and stabs another (we hear a crunch and groans when they are struck). Two boys play fight with wooden sticks that transform to swords, spears and arrows in several scenes (in their imaginations). A girl throws a long stick as if it is a spear at a boy while they play. A boy holds a stick (as if it is a knife) to a stuffed rabbit’s neck and threatens it. We see several children seemingly living on the streets and they are scruffy with dirty faces and clothes. A boy runs through woods with other boys and they are shown stealing money from a man; a girl chases them and we see her running through a hole in a tree and following a trail while chasing a rabbit.


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Come Away LANGUAGE 1

 – Name-calling (duffer, dreadful day, stupid, dirty little vermin, muck, pampered, arrogant little snob), exclamations (blimey, hurry along, get a move on, you’ll be the death of me), 1 religious exclamation (Oh for God’s Sake). | profanity glossary |


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Come Away SUBSTANCE USE

 – A woman drinks sherry in several scenes and a young girl asks her what her “potion” does, a young girl drinks the remaining sherry in a decanter and she imagines that she shrinks, a man drinks whiskey, and a man off-screen says that he is “going for an ale.”.


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Come Away DISCUSSION TOPICS

 – “Peter Pan,” “Alice in Wonderland,” growing up, growing old, losing the ability to dream, death of a child, grief, classism, adventure, imagination, discovering new lands, fairies, guilt, betrayal, fathers, feeling a failure, parental disappointment, gender roles, parental pride, gambling.

Come Away MESSAGE

 – Don’t let life drag you down and never forget how to dream.

CAVEATS

Be aware that while we do our best to avoid spoilers it is impossible to disguise all details and some may reveal crucial plot elements.

We've gone through several editorial changes since we started covering films in 1992 and older reviews are not as complete & accurate as recent ones; we plan to revisit and correct older reviews as resources and time permits.

Our ratings and reviews are based on the theatrically-released versions of films; on video there are often Unrated, Special, Director's Cut or Extended versions, (usually accurately labelled but sometimes mislabeled) released that contain additional content, which we did not review.


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support us

PLEASE DONATE

We are a totally independent website with no connections to political, religious or other groups & we neither solicit nor choose advertisers. You can help us keep our independence with a donation.

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