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The Sea Beast | 2022 | PG | – 1.3.2

content-ratingsWhy is “The Sea Beast” rated PG? The MPAA rating has been assigned for “action, violence and some language.” The Kids-In-Mind.com evaluation includes many scenes of encounters with giant sea creatures that throw ships around in the sea and cause some to capsize and a couple to sink with few visible injuries, many arguments, yelling, threats of arrest, and some name-calling. Read our parents’ guide below for details on sexual content, violence & strong language.


An adventurous orphan girl (voiced by Zaris-Angel Hator) stows away on a monster hunter’s (voiced by Karl Urban) ship in order to experience sea monsters and their capture. Eventually, she realizes that many monster tales in her beloved books are only government-sponsored propaganda. Also with the voices of Jared Harris, Marianne Jean-Baptiste, Dan Stevens, Kathy Burke, Jim Carter, Doon Mackichan and Helen Sadler. Directed by Chris Williams. [Running Time: 1:55]

The Sea Beast SEX/NUDITY 1

 – A shirtless man is shown in one scene (his bare chest, abdomen and back are seen).

The Sea Beast VIOLENCE/GORE 3

 – We see many scenes with a large creature that has green scales, sharp teeth and a nose horn, a large red creature with yellow eyes, blunt teeth and a nose horn, a giant purple crab, and a tiny blue creature that squeaks and is kept as a pet.
 Several sequences include monster hunters that resemble pirates, firing rifles, handguns, spears, harpoons, and cannonballs at either a green creature or a red creature (we hear growls but see no blood) and we see a lot of fireballs and smoke; the creatures ram and tilt the ships and a few men fall out of crows nests and into the water but are pulled back aboard, people and objects slide back and forth on the decks and in the cabins, a man saves another man from drowning, and a navy ship sinks (we do not see or hear about any deaths). Men and women swing knives and swords at the creatures to no avail, but a man slices off several tendrils from one creature, it spews black blood, it falls unconscious underwater (likely dying) and the man cuts off its nose horn. A fight sequence features a creature slamming a ship and being stabbed with a huge poison-tipped spear, it falls unconscious (no blood shows) and men pull out the spear and tie up the creature, dragging it to their homeport.
 A flashback shows a preteen boy escape from a burning ship and he drifts on a large piece of wood as we see the large burning ship in the background and a man on another ship finds the boy and takes him onboard.
 Men on a ship threaten each other with guns and swords, without fighting, in several scenes. A man with a sword and another man with a knife fight using slashing and kicking and one man falls several times, finally landing in the water with a young girl; a creature rises up in the water and swallows them (we see them held in the creature’s mouth and they exit through a nostril when the creature puts them on an island). A young girl yells and attacks a man with a knife until another man stops her.
 A ship hauls a giant creature into a city and a young girl and a woman cut it loose; it smashes into part of a castle and a dock area, throwing crumbled cement into the air and causing spectators to gasp and shout. A man and a young girl step on large eggs, releasing hundreds of small beasts that chase them; a large beast (it’s like a seal with tusks) joins the chase, and the man tosses a small beast at it and it stops chasing them. A young girl and a man pull many spears out of a creature’s back and it growls (no blood is visible). A young girl locked in a ship’s cabin is freed by a small creature that rips off the porthole covering.
 A giant crab covered in spikes and having many rows of sharp teeth, and a huge fish with a horn fight on a beach with snapping, ramming, biting, and roaring for several seconds (no blood is shown); a man swings a sword at the crab several times and stabs it with a spear (no blood is shown), a young girl falls into the water and a tiny creature helps her swim to shore, the fish bites the crab and the crab limps away into the water to end the scene.
 A shirtless man faces the camera as another man sews something up on his back (we can’t see the injury, but we see two long scars on his chest). A woman has a peg leg and another woman has a prosthetic hook for a hand. A man wears an eye patch, stating that a sea monster injured his eye 30 years earlier. A young girl falls down a hillside and lies still as a man picks her up and finds blood on his hand; we later see a bandage around the girl’s arm, a woman gives the girl a knife and the girl waves it around and sticks it in a wooden wall. A woman on a ship puts several knives into her waistband and throws an axe and a mace into a dartboard on a wall. A thunderstorm includes rain, lightning, and thunder and a small boat is damaged but on one is harmed.
 A man looks at a book about himself as a monster hunter and sees false stories about creatures killing many people and destroying many cities (which never existed); the man shouts that this is nonsense, and he stops another man from killing a creature, and breaking a huge harpoon over his knee. A young girl holds a book up to a crowd and shouts about propaganda and lies made up by a king and queen in order to profit from killing sea creatures; soldiers pointing guns put away their weapons, as the crowd shouts that they agree, and the royals run away. A man shouts and rants for several seconds at a man and a woman for refusing to pay for a sea creature’s horn and turning monster-hunting over to the navy; the man and the woman belittle him for saving another ship and its captain instead of killing a creature and they order his arrest, but another man stops the arrest at gunpoint by pleading for another chance and this is granted. A man shouts in pain as he tries to break a large spear over his knee several times.
 We hear about many sea monsters killing people and see line drawings of them on maps of the world, including a giant octopus, a huge whale with a horn, a giant squid and something with a large mouth filled with sharp teeth. We hear that a sea monster killed an orphan’s parents and see the orphan telling other orphans’ stories about monster hunters’ heroics, by candlelight in an orphanage for monster hunters’ children; the children are reprimanded for not being in bed by a matron that yells at them. Many characters mention a ship and how everyone aboard died while fighting monsters.
 The monster hunters’ motto is, “Live a great life, die a great death” and we hear it several times. Two men argue several times, and a man and a little girl argue several times. A man argues with a large creature that growls at his words, and a young girl intervenes to make them stop. A man and a woman yell for several seconds at two men and a young girl in different scenes. A man says he will kill a creature several times, but does not harm it. A man throws a book against a wall and screams. The end credits include a sea shanty about a man who guts and kills monsters, drinks a lot, and once killed the same man 50 times.
 A man visits a woman to purchase a poison potion that she makes from glowing powder; the woman has a giant pointed nose, slanted eyes, ragged long gray hair, she cackles like a witch and she sells him a harpoon launcher for shooting a poison-tipped harpoon and the man vows to kill every living thing in the sea. A small creature with a swollen belly lies beside a lot of fish skeletons and groans (implying that it ate too much). Many huge eels with glowing eyes swim by a ship.

The Sea Beast LANGUAGE 2

 – 1 anatomical term, 3 mild obscenities, name-calling (rum gagger, devil, demons, fish killers, coward, lubbers, dumb, fool, stupid, beast, donkey, infernal, Captain Someday), exclamations (bloody, bollocksed, whoo, ugh), 3 religious exclamations (e.g. by God, by the powers, hand of God). | profanity glossary |

The Sea Beast SUBSTANCE USE

 – A man pours wine from a carafe into two short glasses and he and another man drink them, a tavern scene includes several trays of foaming ale as a man says, “Drinks are on us” and a few adults sip from tankards, a man coughs and spits ale across a table, a young girl picks up a full tankard of ale and a man takes it from her, several kegs of ale are tapped and foam spews out as we see tankards of foamy ale carried around on trays on a ship, and a man and a woman drink from an unlabeled pint bottle that appears to be whiskey.

The Sea Beast DISCUSSION TOPICS

 – Propaganda, lies, finding the truth, far right-wing politics, power, greed, manipulating history to control a population, people who are different, honor codes, family, loyalty, protecting minorities, animal cruelty, freeing the wrongly accused, hero-worship.

The Sea Beast MESSAGE

 – Learn how to recognize fake news and political propaganda.

CAVEATS

Be aware that while we do our best to avoid spoilers it is impossible to disguise all details and some may reveal crucial plot elements.

We've gone through several editorial changes since we started covering films in 1992 and older reviews are not as complete & accurate as recent ones; we plan to revisit and correct older reviews as resources and time permits.

Our ratings and reviews are based on the theatrically-released versions of films; on video there are often Unrated, Special, Director's Cut or Extended versions, (usually accurately labelled but sometimes mislabeled) released that contain additional content, which we did not review.


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